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News / When supply chains go pear-shaped: Goodyear Dunlop calls for more clarity

first_img An example of just how poorly container shipping lines communicate with shippers was underscored last week, at the TOC Container Supply Chain event in Rotterdam, when a major shipper gave a vivid insight into a recent supply chain debacle.Tomi Puolakka, regional logistics director of the EMEA region for tyre manufacturer Goodyear Dunlop, related how his company was one of the shippers caught up in the chaos which followed a fire in some containers stowed on board the 13,000 teu Hanjin Green Earth, as it transited the Suez Canal on a northbound passage on 1 May.“Shippers understand that things go wrong – we work in logistics. What is crucial is what is done after something has gone wrong and how is it rectified, because there is a customer at the end of the supply chain who is paying money to get their product and they are really not that interested in what happened,” he said.On 4 May, an incident alert was sent from the carrier to Goodyear Dunlop’s global procurement team. Goodyear then asked the carrier if it had any cargo on board the vessel. The next day the carrier replied that two containers were on board.“The following day, my freight forwarder tells me that we actually have an additional 22 containers on board the vessel. We asked the carrier to verify, and on the same day the carrier replied that we actually had 32 containers on the ship.The next message from the carrier was an advisory that the fire had been extinguished and there were no major issues, with the vessel now sailing to another port – which ought to have provided some relief, but was in fact where the chain of communication became intractably confused.“From a shipper’s perspective, my first concern is, what I am going to tell my customer? Once I know what is in those 32 containers, and what state they are in, I can work out which of my customers are impacted, which is going to suffer delays and what alternative shipments of the same product I need to arrange.“So it would be interesting to know what the condition of my cargo is,” he said.But the company received no further information until five days later, when it was simply told that the vessel was sailing to Spain from Port Said.“An ETA was issued, but there was no information on the status of the goods. We persisted but there was no more information until we were notified that the vessel had arrived in Spain and was then proceeding to Hamburg. That was on 25 May.“That day, we also received a message saying that the vessel was due to arrive in Hamburg on 25 May. I’m not an expert in maritime shipments but that seems pretty quick to me.”After receiving a correction that the vessel would arrive on 27 May, and that a survey of the cargo had begun, the silence resumed.At the beginning of June, Goodyear Dunlop was informed that 31 containers had arrived in Hamburg.“Presumably the other one was still in Spain,” said Mr Puolakka.“Then we began the procedures in terms of damages; what can we claim, how we will be compensated, and so on. But this is almost a month after the initial incident.“We understand things go wrong but what do I tell my customers? That we are asking and asking but we really don’t know what the condition of the cargo is because our carrier won’t talk to us…?“In this age of technology this is unacceptable. We should know where everything is, what the condition of the cargo is. There should be active communications coming to us proactively.“We are not asking for the moon – we are not asking the carriers to create massive control towers with teams creating reams of information, but it would be nice if there was a data repository – information online that we could log-in to and find out the status on our own. I have a lot of shipment planners; I have a big shipping team with a lot of people working on import and export,” he said.In total, Goodyear Dunlop ships about 150,000 teu a year globally, with 30,000-35,000 teu in the EMEA region.“When things go really pear-shaped it would be nice if there was proactive dialogue and we could solve the problems together. A lot of this can be done because the technology exists today and really isn’t very expensive at all,” he said. By Gavin van Marle 15/06/2015last_img read more

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News / Hong Kong secures its shipping hub status with nod to vessel-sharing agreements

first_imgBy Sam Whelan, Asia correspondent 10/08/2017 The Hong Kong Competition Commission has issued a five-year block exemption order for liner shipping vessel-sharing agreements (VSAs).However, it declined to issue a similar exemption for vessel-discussion agreements (VDAs).The order, announced on Tuesday, follows two years of legal uncertainty for shipping lines after the city’s Competition Ordinance came into effect in 2015.At the time, interpretation of Hong Kong’s new antitrust regulations was uncertain and there was speculation on whether VSAs, which form the basis of container shipping alliances, would become effectively illegal.In that case, without an exemption, carriers could face heavy fines – up to 10% of their Hong Kong turnover for up to three years. Furthermore, with such exemptions already in place at competing transhipment hubs in Singapore, Malaysia and mainland China, carriers warned they could have to abandon Hong Kong calls.The commission’s decision acknowledged the “economic efficiencies generated” by VSAs and followed an application by the Hong Kong Liner Shipping Association (HKLSA) in December 2015.The commission said VSAs, which carriers use to manage capacity via slot exchange and joint service agreements and alliances, were “unlikely to result in significant harm to competition, unless the VSA activities allow members to enjoy some degree of market power”.It exempted VSAs from the Ordinance’s ‘First Conduct Rule’ so long as parties to a VSA do not collectively exceed a market share limit of 40% and the VSA does not “authorise or require shipping lines to engage in cartel conduct”.VDAs, where carriers share commercial information like rates, were not exempted, on the basis that “it was not demonstrated that the relevant VDA activities meet the terms of efficiency exclusion”.According to legal firm Ince & Co, carriers are required to use guidance published by the commission to self-assess which VDA activities would cause competition concerns. It said parties involved “need to assess the nature of the VDAs carefully to ascertain whether the nature and content of discussions fall within what could be considered acceptable by the competition commission”.The decision to exclude VDAs was welcomed by Hong Kong Shippers’ Council executive director Sunny Ho. He said: “VDAs, entirely anti-competitive in nature, remain a core of any competition considerations.”However, HKLSA secretary general Roberto Giannetta told The Loadstar he was disappointed that VDAs were excluded.“We are pleased that the HKCC recognised the value and numerous efficiencies of carrier cooperative agreements and has granted an exemption for operational agreements. On the flip side, we are disappointed that the HKCC did not grant the same level of value and efficiency by extending the exemption to commercial agreements (VDAs).“Many neighbouring jurisdictions have very recently reviewed their own exemption applications for shipping and have reconfirmed that these VDAs promote valuable efficiencies for carriers, customers, local consumers and national economies.”last_img read more

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Celgene sells psoriasis pill to Amgen for $13.4 billion, clearing way for close of Bristol merger

first_img By Adam Feuerstein Aug. 26, 2019 Reprints Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Biotech Adam Feuerstein Amgen said Monday that it will buy the psoriasis pill Otezla from Celgene, which is selling the medicine to remove an antitrust obstacle from its planned merger with Bristol-Myers Squibb.The purchase price for Otezla is $13.4 billion — higher than many analysts expected. Celgene sells psoriasis pill to Amgen for $13.4 billion, clearing way for close of Bristol merger What is it? Senior Writer, Biotech Adam is STAT’s national biotech columnist, reporting on the intersection of biotech and Wall Street. He’s also a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. [email protected] GET STARTEDcenter_img Log In | Learn More What’s included? Ric Francis/AP STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. About the Author Reprints Tags biotechnology Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the biotech sector — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED @adamfeuerstein last_img read more

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Doctors warn an inability to smell could be a symptom of Covid-19 — but caution the evidence is preliminary

first_img By Erin Brodwin March 23, 2020 Reprints Erin Brodwin About the Author Reprints Health care workers are calling attention to a potential new symptom of a novel coronavirus infection: the loss of one’s sense of smell.Clinicians in the U.S. and elsewhere around the world have reported, anecdotally, that some patients infected with the virus experience anosmia, or an inability to smell. The American Academy of Otolaryngology recently called for anosmia to be added to a list of screening tools for Covid-19, the disease caused by the virus. On Monday, World Health Organization officials announced they were further probing a possible link between anosmia and coronavirus — though they noted the evidence of a potential connection remains preliminary.“A loss of smell or a loss of taste is something that we’re looking into,” Maria Van Kerkhove, the head of WHO’s emerging diseases and zoonoses unit, said on a briefing call with reporters on Monday. “We are reaching out to a number of countries and looking at the cases that have already been reported to see if this is a common feature. We don’t have the answer to that yet.”advertisement Please enter a valid email address. @erbrod “It’s certainly popping up as a symptom, but how universal it is, we don’t know,” said Eric Holbrook, director of rhinology at Massachusetts Eye and Ear, a Boston hospital. Holbrook said he started hearing about the possible tie between anosmia and coronavirus in case reports from clinicians in Europe about a week ago.advertisement For people with underlying health conditions, the coronavirus presents ‘all the ingredients’ for danger Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. [email protected] Tags Coronavirusphysicianscenter_img A health care worker tends to patients at the drive-in center at ProHealth Care in Jericho, N.Y. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images Leave this field empty if you’re human: Using the new symptom as a screening tool is a delicate task, experts noted. Emphasizing it too early, or too heavily, could mean clinicians might miss patients who haven’t lost their sense of smell, but who are infected and have other symptoms. Ignoring a lost sense of smell, however, could mean doctors don’t detect infection in cases where patients have only mild symptoms or are asymptomatic. In those cases, using anosmia as a screening tool could help clinicians catch cases that would otherwise fly under the radar and give those infected individuals more guidance on self-isolation.But to do that, clinicians need more data on the role anosmia might play in Covid-19.“One of the things I think a lot of physicians and patients are struggling with is trying to determine whether these mild symptoms are related to, say, allergies or a mild cold,” Holbrook said. He added that it’s also difficult to distinguish between a loss of the sense of smell and a loss of the sense of taste, which patients can sometimes mix up.“But anything that gives us a heads-up into who needs to be isolated or tested, that might be a good screening tool,” Holbrook said.To get a better handle on the new symptom and its ties to coronavirus, Holbrook said he and his colleagues will be looking at people with anosmia and confirmed Covid-19, as well as those experiencing anosmia who have tested negative. That will allow them to compare both groups and understand whether anosmia is truly a core coronavirus symptom.“That’s important data — data that we need. Many of us are trying to start doing those studies,” Holbrook said.Helen Branswell contributed reporting.An earlier version of this article mischaracterized South Korean research about anosmia. It was a non peer-reviewed report which suggested that roughly 30% of South Koreans with Covid-19 lose their sense of smell, not a Nature study. HealthDoctors warn an inability to smell could be a symptom of Covid-19 — but caution the evidence is preliminary There are a number of unanswered questions about the new potential symptom, which at this point, is thought to be temporary. Experts aren’t sure how common it is, or at what point in the progression of the disease a patient loses the ability to smell. They also want to be sure the new symptom isn’t merely a sign of allergies, a cold, or the seasonal flu, all of which can lead a person to develop anosmia or ageusia, the reduced sense of taste that can sometimes accompany an inability to smell. Privacy Policy linkedin.com/in/erinbrodwin/ Related: Those reports are among a growing amount of anecdotal evidence that suggests experts might want to consider anosmia as a potential sign of infection. In report published on March 16 in the South Korean newspaper Chosun, clinicians estimated that roughly 30% of patients who tested positive for coronavirus had temporarily lost their sense of smell. In Germany, clinicians at the University Hospital in Bonn surveyed 100 patients with coronavirus and found that up to two-thirds “described a loss of smell and taste lasting several days,” Hendrik Streeck, head of the hospital’s virology institute, told the German news site Frankfurter Allgemeine.The known symptoms of Covid-19 have evolved as cases have climbed globally. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lists fever, cough, and shortness of breath as the core coronavirus symptoms. Difficulty breathing, persistent chest pain or pressure, confusion, and bluish lips or face are listed as emergency symptoms for which people should seek immediate care. The WHO says other symptoms can include tiredness, fatigue, and in some patients, “aches and pains, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat, or diarrhea.”The WHO and CDC haven’t added anosmia to their coronavirus symptom lists, which health care workers use to screen patients who might have been infected with coronavirus. But some health care workers are encouraging their peers to consider the symptom when caring for patients they suspect might have be infected.“I wouldn’t use it alone [to screen patients], but I think if it’s added to some of the other symptoms, it adds to the possibility,” said Holbrook. “If someone says yes, it would definitely make me more suspicious that they need further work-up.” Health Tech Correspondent, San Francisco Erin is a California-based health tech reporter and the co-author of the STAT Health Tech newsletter.last_img read more

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Pharmalittle: Regeneron says its antibody prevented Covid-19 in a trial; EU threatens to impose vaccine export controls

first_img Rise and shine, folks, another busy day is on the way. We can tell because our short person is, once again, hunched over a laptop and our official mascot has an early play date on the campus grounds with another pup from the hood. This leaves us to fire up the trusty coffee kettle and tackle our fluctuating to-do list. On that note, here are a few items of interest to help you on your own journey today, which we hope is productive and meaningful. Meanwhile, stay in touch and stay safe — wear a mask. …Regeneron Pharmaceuticals (REGN) reported that its monoclonal antibody cocktail prevented Covid-19 in a clinical trial, STAT notes. The news, issued via a press release, mirrored similar news last week from Eli Lilly (LLY) that its monoclonal antibody prevented symptomatic Covid-19 infections in nursing homes. The results represent the first 400 volunteers from the study, which is being run by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and is continuing to enroll patients. The volunteers were at high risk of infection because they lived in the same household as a Covid-19 patient. Ed Silverman By Ed Silverman Jan. 26, 2021 Reprints Tags STAT+ Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED @Pharmalot Log In | Learn More GET STARTED Pharmalittle: Regeneron says its antibody prevented Covid-19 in a trial; EU threatens to impose vaccine export controls What is it?center_img Pharmalot What’s included? [email protected] STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Alex Hogan/STAT About the Author Reprintslast_img read more

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Governor DeSantis activates National Guard ahead of Inauguration Day

first_imgDeSantis briefed on blue-green algae treatment used on Caloosahatchee June 7, 2021 Advertisement AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments Florida bans ‘critical race theory’ from public school classrooms June 13, 2021 Registration opens for 2021 Florida Python Challenge June 4, 2021 Advertisement LCSO among law enforcement agencies deploying officers to Texas, Arizona June 16, 2021center_img AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments RELATEDTOPICS TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Governor Ron DeSantis has activated the National Guard after reports of potential civil unrest ahead of President-Elect Joe Biden’s inauguration. The Florida National Guard will coordinate with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement in its efforts to support state and local law enforcement, according to Governor DeSantis. The executive order will take immediate effect and will remain in full force and effect until January 24. Governor DeSantis said the order will be terminated after consulting with the adjutant general and the commissioner of the department of law enforcement. AdvertisementTags: CapitolGovernor Ron DeSantisInauguration DayNational Guard Advertisementlast_img read more

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SMC students set to shine at SMFF

first_imgHomeFeaturedSMC students set to shine at SMFF Dec. 07, 2018 at 8:30 amFeaturedNewsSMC students set to shine at SMFFAngel Carreras3 years agoNo tagsSMC students shooting a film on location. Santa Monica has long been a creative hub for the film industry and students at Santa Monica College are doing their part to uphold the tradition.Three Santa Monica College students will be presenting their films at the Santa Monica Film Festival this Saturday. The stories of their films, with genres ranging from thriller to western to documentary, are just as varied as the lives of the filmmakers themselves. “What ‘Hinge’, ‘Once Upon a Woman’, and ‘Undocumented’ all have in common is that these are films that have something meaningful to say about the world we live in,” Salvador Carrasco, SMC film professor said, “Which tends to happen because our SMC filmmakers bring their rich life experiences and perspectives to the screen with a high level of artistry and uncompromising honesty.”“Hinge”, directed by Lisa Mayo, is a story of a lesbian couple whose lives become challenged by their mentally unstable neighbor. The story was loosely inspired by real-life events, according to Mayo. The 37-year old Mayo, who was a year into nursing before pivoting full-time to film, says a friend of hers was once attacked by an unstable neighbor. Additionally, she experienced similar situations as a nurse.  “It’ll beg the question of what do you do when you have people that have mental health issues living in your neighborhood,” she said. “I hope people walk away with a different perspective, understanding that mentally ill people are not bad people. What, as humans, can we do to figure out how to engage and handle these situations?”From a claustrophobic neighborhood thrill to the wide open west, “Once Upon a Woman” looks to bring an old-school flavor to SMFF. “It’s revisionist and a throwback,” director Wayne Hodges said. “Westerns are to movies as jazz is to music. It’s a genre that takes it’s time. This one feels like a throwback to early Clint when he was doing the spaghetti westerns, a nod to yesteryear.” The 43-year old former-Marine-turned-Lee-Strasburg-Student / Staff-Member-Turned-Bouncer-Turned-Director’s film is described in it’s synopsis as a Western set after the Civil War. Hodges says familiar genre trappings such as Cowboys and Indians will be included and will dive into personal struggles of the two, all while framed against the approach of life-altering industrialization and the railroad … and doom.Rounding out the student’s films is the topical documentary “Undocumented.”The film is well-regarded already, having been an official selection at the 38th International Festival of Film Schools in Munich and a cadre of other film festivals as well as winning awards for Best Director at the Silicon Beach Film Festival, winning Best Audio Visual Film at the Los Angeles CineFest, and becoming a semi-finalist at the Hollywood International Independent Documentary Awards.Directed by Bishal Dutta and co-produced by Lindsay Eberts, Oscar Huezo, and Dennis Sandoval, Eberts says the documentary focuses on a Dreamer figuring out a way to live his American Dream.“It’s a great starting point for human immigration policy,” Eberts said. “A lot of people are talking about immigration like its a black and white issue and we would love to use this film as a jumping off point for a more nuanced discussion.”Eberts helped edit the documentary as well as as of now, trying to find it a home after festivals. Formerly in holistic medicine, the 39-year old Eberts changed her life to focus on film after stints in London, Canada and France. She says she did so to focus on what matters most in her life, creativity, following in the footsteps of her father, Dances with Wolves producer the late Jake Eberts. “I felt I could go to school and learn from what he did and learn, get my feet back from under me,” she said. “My first day of class at SMC was an epiphany.”SMC and changing careers — and arguably, their lives — is the common thread tying these up-and-coming, age-is-just-a-number film mavericks together. “I’ve always wanted to write and direct but never admitted to myself or knew there was a place for me as a brown female in this industry,” Mayo said. “Never saw myself in that role. But Sal (Carrasco) made me think it was possible.”“It’s the best collaborative experience in film i’ve ever had. They let artists be artists and at the same time, there was always a respect there,” Hodges said.“The program is so diverse,” Eberts said. “Age, race, religion, it’s unbelievable.  You’ve got underserved populations who are able to come to SMC, tell their stories and get them made. It’s unlike any other film program out there.”The Santa Monica Film Festival takes place at the Laemmle Monica Film Center, 1332 2nd Street in downtown Santa Monica 10 a.m. to 11 p.m.Ticket information and access codes are available on the festival’s website, www.smff.org/tickets while supplies last. Q and A sessions will follow each block of screenings. [email protected] on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentPlanning Commission backs new housing by the beachArguments but no resolution to ongoing voting rights lawsuitYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall9 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press19 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press19 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson19 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter19 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor19 hours agolast_img read more

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Your column here – Silence is Complicity

first_img Ina Thorner says: 3 Comments We all MUST stand together for this inhuman violence to stop. Black, brown, red, yellow, white, mixed. All of us. Black men are being murdered. Red women are being murdered. Brown men, women and children are being kept in cages. Many immigrants are in slavery. Where are the moms? The women of the Me Too movement? The businesses we all sustain? Do they care less for human life than property? Where are the interfaith organizations? The balanced media coverage? The politicians? May 30, 2020 at 12:18 PM I cannot even imagine standing around doing nothing while an adult verbally harasses a child! What is wrong with people??? I hope that I shall always do the right thing and be an ally.Thank you for all that you do! Comments are closed. May 30, 2020 at 1:49 PM May 31, 2020 at 6:32 PM HomeBad BehaviorYour column here – Silence is Complicity May. 30, 2020 at 6:00 amBad BehaviorColumnsFeaturedNewsYour Column HereYour column here – Silence is ComplicityGuest Author1 year ago#blacklivesmattercommittee for racial justiceSanta Monica Bay Human Relations CouncilSURJyour column here Written by the Committee for Racial JusticeEndorsed by the Santa Monica Bay Human Relations CouncilBy now, many people know the names Ahmaud Arbery and, more recently, George Floyd. Many are wondering how/why do these events keep happening. There may be some clues in a local event in Santa Monica that you may have read about in last weekend’s paper. A little black boy was riding his bike home with his mom. They were around 4th and Montana when a young white man started swearing at and using the “N” word while verbally assaulting the boy. That hate crime was bad enough, but this was not a deserted street. There were passers-by and they DID NOTHING! This is nothing new. Robbie Jones, a 62yr Pico Neighborhood resident, says “28 years ago, when my son was attending Roosevelt elementary school. I experienced almost the exact same incident . The guy was a body builder. He came directly at me shouting obscenities and racial slurs at me and then attempted to punch me in the face as people on the street walked pass. I remember being relieved and grateful as I hurriedly got on the bus shaken, disturbed and just cried my eyes out. I remember feeling ashamed (as though I had caused this to come upon myself). I felt frightened, angry and sad all at the same time. I am still shaken by the incident today.”Do white people understand that when we see or hear something and DO NOTHING, we are causing more trauma? Silence is not neutral. Silence is on the side of the oppressor. Our high schools are not immune. When black students are threatened, white students stand by and do nothing and white parents protect the oppressors, and deride the black parents, causing further trauma. In a racist country, especially when witnessing a racist event, to be silent is to strengthen the systems of oppression and increase the trauma. Silence in the face of racism speaks volumes. Silence IS complicity.If we are white and we “Stand by” and “act nice” and are not working to be anti-racist, we are fueling the system. We did not shout at this little boy, but we might as well have. We didn’t shoot Ahmaud Arbery or suffocate George Floyd or murder the thousands of other unnamed victims of racism, but we might as well have. We are a part of the system that allows this to happen. If we are not working to eradicate racism then we are contributing to the problem. From the little boy on 4th and Montana to the man jogging through a white neighborhood, these incidents stem from systemic problems. We have a choice. We can do nothing and allow it to become worse. Or we can actively work to eradicate it. Anti-racist work will be misunderstood by your friends. They will try to convince you that there was a reason for each of these incidents, claiming that in each case, the black person was in the wrong somehow, and that you just don’t have enough evidence/information. You are jumping to conclusions and don’t really understand how life works, they will say. Your friends mean well but they are contributing to the problem. And so are you if you allow them to derail your sense of justice. That is part of how the system reinforces itself.Do not stand by and watch and strengthen the racism that infects our society. Stand with us against racism and work for justice. It does not have to be this way. We can dismantle this system. But it will take a whole lot more of us standing up, calling out and working for a better way. We hope you will join us. #CommitteeForRacialJustice, #SURJ, #BlackLivesMatter, #AWAREWritten by the Committee for Racial Justice. Endorsed by the Santa Monica Bay Human Relations CouncilTags :#blacklivesmattercommittee for racial justiceSanta Monica Bay Human Relations CouncilSURJyour column hereshare on Facebookshare on Twittershow 3 comments Cathie Gentile says: Romney Woods says: Thank you.Thank you.Thank you.Thank you.Thank you so very much.It’s nice to hear someone speak about a SOLUTION to the/this problem, and not just about the Problem !!#Solutions To The Problem (#STP)#MeToo,Too Virus ignited in US no earlier than mid-January, study saysAirport artists create drive-by art in isolationYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall6 hours agoColumnsOpinionYour Column HereBring Back Library ServicesGuest Author12 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter17 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor17 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press17 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press17 hours agolast_img read more

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DT finance head puts £10B price tag on EE

first_img Tags Steve works across all of Mobile World Live’s channels and played a lead role in the launch and ongoing success of our apps and devices services. He has been a journalist…More Read more Previous ArticleAT&T head: new approaches to boost performanceNext ArticleNTT Docomo targets 150Mb/s LTE Deutsche Telekom eyes 5G, fibre lead Deutsche TelekomEEFinancialFrance Telecom Steve Costello AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 16 MAY 2013 Home DT finance head puts £10B price tag on EE Operators back Qualcomm role in open RAN path Deutsche Telekom mooted a value of £10 billion for EE, its UK joint venture with France Telecom, noting that a partial listing is its preferred option of the business in the future.According to Reuters, Timotheus Hottges, CFO of the company, told a shareholder meeting that “such a process needs good timing”.“We need to wait for the right moment to place such a huge amount on the market,” he said.The future ownership structure of EE has been in the spotlight for some months, with it reported last month that France Telecom had appointed banks to advise on its options for its 50 per cent stake.According to speculation earlier this year, Deutsche Telekom and France Telecom could jointly sell 25 per cent of EE, meaning they will retain a joint 75 per cent share. Such a transaction could net them each more than £1 billion.In an interview with Mobile World Live earlier this year, Olaf Swantee, CEO of EE, said that interest in the company in terms of an IPO or private equity acquisition has been “enormous”, although he added that the JV structure “has been very successful to date”.Hottges is set to take over as CEO of Deutsche Telekom when Rene Obermann, the incumbent, stands down later this year. Deutsche Telekom, SoftBank tipped for T-Mobile trade Related Authorlast_img read more

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Monday Scramble: Phil wraps up year Tiger hasn’t yet begun

first_imgBrendan Steele snaps a five-year drought, Phil Mickelson takes a break, Se Ri Pak says goodbye, Johnny questions Tiger’s health and more in this week’s edition of Monday Scramble: Apologies for the reminder, but the golf world was supposed to be buzzing today, the aftershocks of Tiger Woods’ first competitive start in 14 months. Alas, we know how that turned out. Woods’ last-minute withdrawal set the tone for what became a sleepy, sloppy season opener in Wine Country. Sure, Phil Mickelson still flirted with contention, but otherwise the Safeway featured three days of weather delays and re-introductions. It may not have been the can’t-miss show we were expecting, but don’t tell that to Brendan Steele. A new PGA Tour season has begun, with or without Tiger.  1. A year ago in Napa, Steele led after 54 holes. Then he made eight bogeys (including a back-nine 40) to shoot 76 and plummet into a tie for 17th.  There was no collapse this time. Instead, Steele erased a four-shot lead with a closing 65, making birdie on his last three holes, the final one after a nifty wedge to 10 feet. “This is a little bit of redemption from last year,” he said. “It’s nice to close it off this way.” 2. It was also Steele’s first victory post-anchoring ban, which was no small feat. The last few years have been a struggle on the greens for Steele, who used to wield a belly putter. Deciding to switch in 2014, after the ban was first announced, he ranked outside the top 120 in strokes gained-putting each of the past two seasons. At the Safeway, he was sixth in putting, holing more than 133 feet worth of putts in the final round.  Steele’s first victory in more than five years should give hope to those who were forced to abandon the long wand. After all, major winners Keegan Bradley and Webb Simpson haven’t been the same since the ban went into effect on Jan. 1.   3. It’s a different part of the game that has held back Mickelson in recent years. Winless since July 2013 – remarkably, a month longer than Woods’ drought – Mickelson has gotten increasingly errant off the tee. No, he has never driven the ball on a rope, but he has dropped outside the top 130 in both strokes gained-off the tee and driving accuracy.  At tree-lined Silverado, where driving accuracy was paramount because of preferred lies in the fairway, Lefty found the short grass only 25 times in 56 opportunities. That ranked 62nd out of the 70 players who made the cut. With his putting back on track, his driving will be the primary focus of his offseason work. Phil isn’t expected to tee it up again until late January, so he’ll have plenty of time to figure it out.  4. How hard is it to win on the PGA Tour for the first time? Watch a replay of Patton Kizzire’s final few holes. He held a two-shot lead with seven holes to play, but his swing betrayed him down the stretch. He drove into a fairway bunker on 12, under a tree on 15 and 16, and then left a wedge shot woefully short on 17. On the final hole, he pulled his drive left, into the rough, and had to lay up. He flailed a 9-iron right of the green and couldn’t hole the chip. At least his putting looked solid.  “I’m really disappointed,” he said, “but I played well. It’s a building block.”  5. Paul Casey continued to remind the European Ryder Cup team what it was missing when he tied for third at the Safeway.  Casey declined to take up European Tour membership because he wanted to spend more time with his family, which is based in Phoenix. To be a tour member, players must compete in five tournaments outside of the majors and WGCs. Europe certainly could have used Casey at Hazeltine – the team suffered its worst loss since 1981, while the Englishman has now finished in the top four in his last four appearances on the PGA Tour. “I wanted to be there,” he said, “but the best seat in the house has to be at home with the TV and glass of wine, doesn’t it?”  6. Speaking of which … after losing for just the second time since 1999, the European Ryder Cup team will have a new skipper as early as this December. Paul McGinley, the victorious 2014 captain, told Reuters that a decision on Europe’s next captain should be made before Christmas. The committee includes the past three captains – Darren Clarke, McGinley and Jose Maria Olazabal – European Tour CEO Keith Pelley and someone nominated by the players’ committee (likely Henrik Stenson).  Thomas Bjorn is considered the frontrunner for the position. 7. Did you know: Alex Noren is the 18th-ranked player in the world. That’s one spot ahead of Matt Kuchar. Just four months ago, he was ranked outside the top 100 (No. 108). He just won his third event in his last eight starts, at the British Masters. Four of his seven career titles have come in the past two seasons, but he is still looking to make a splash on a big stage. He has only one top-15 in 14 career major appearances. 8. Maybe Lee Westwood won’t just fade into oblivion, after all.  After a yippy, confidence-shattering performance at the Ryder Cup, the 43-year-old rebounded to post a third-place finish in which he shot 68 or better all four rounds.  9. Score one for Pelley. Last week the ambitious Euro Tour CEO unveiled one of his latest ideas – a one-hole, knockout contest under the lights featuring some of the tour’s biggest stars.  By all accounts, it was a rousing success. Players competed in seven quick-fire matches on a 156-yard par 3 in front of a few thousand fans. Check out this video for more.  “It was amazing to see the crowds and everyone enjoying it,” said winner Alexander Levy. “Golf needs something like this, and it is a great idea.” Can you imagine how popular this would be if the Tour held a similar exhibition, say, before the Vegas tournament?  10. Pak ended one of the most influential careers in LPGA history last week in her native South Korea.  It mattered little that she shot 80 before withdrawing with a nagging shoulder issue. This was a celebration of her life and career, with a children’s choir, video montage and long line of well-wishers. Her two-major season in 1998 is widely regarded as one of the biggest catalysts for the sport’s growth in South Korea. Now, six of the top 10 players in the world are South Korean. “I think if we had no so-called Se Ri Kids,” she said, “the Korean golf scene would be quite different today.”  11. Ian Poulter had an encouraging return start, at least early. Poulter, who hadn’t played since mid-May because of a foot injury, opened with 64 to share the first-round lead at the Asian Tour’s Macau Open. It only got worse from there. The Englishman shot rounds of 73-71-73 to tie for 28th against a weak field. Still, Poulter reported no physical setbacks. He took off 14 weeks because of arthritis in his right foot, a condition he can only hope to manage with rest and rehab.   There was plenty of pessimism surrounding Woods’ scheduled return. Part of that was because of his health.  Miller got skewered for the following comment about Woods – as he does for most comments – but he was right in this case. “He was getting out of that cart pretty gingerly (at the Ryder Cup). Nobody talked about that,” Miller said. “When he got in and out of that cart, he was a little – he didn’t look like he was jumping out and saying, ‘Hi, guys.’ So I’m not sure how healthy he really is.” Watching Woods at the Ryder Cup, this observer had the same reaction. He moved slowly and awkwardly, tentatively, like he might tweak something at any moment. He has looked that way ever since he went under the knife for the first time in March 2014.    Keep this in mind: Woods and Henrik Stenson are the same age. They’re both 40. Watching them move around the course, or swing a club, you’d guess that Woods was at least a decade older. This week’s award winners … If Not for That Start …: Justin Thomas. Only seven players posted a score worse than JT’s opening 75 in Napa, a round that included a pair of triple bogeys. He went 66-66-67 to claw back inside the top 10, and now he heads back to Malaysia for his first title defense.  Oh, So THAT’S What It Looks Like: A 423-yard drive. Joe Miller, you beast.  Road to Heaven: Arnold Palmer. As an Orlando resident, it was little surprise to hear that a portion of State Road 408 will be renamed the Arnold Palmer Expressway. This move deserves a thumbs up – not the usual extended finger that we see on the roads here.  Can’t Help But Root For …: Steven Bowditch. He has struggled mightily over the past year or so, but his Twitter game remains on point.  Rookie Hazing: Cody Gribble. The left-hander from Texas was the only Tour rookie who finished in the top 10 in Napa (T-8). Sister Act: Nelly Korda. Following in big sis Jessica’s footsteps, the younger Korda, 18, earned her LPGA card via the Symetra Tour on Sunday.  Not Sure This Item Will Catch On: LPGA Store pants, with the “See Why It’s Different Out Here” slogan embroided on the back pocket. Can’t forget the #seewhyitsdifferent tag! pic.twitter.com/eg8ZJxW6l2 Keeps Getting Better: The high school class of 2011. With Emiliano Grillo earning PGA Tour Rookie of the Year honors, the heralded class now has earned the title three of the past four years (Jordan Spieth and Daniel Berger). Don’t be surprised if the run continues, with Ollie Schniederjans and Cheng-Tsung Pan on deck. Blown Fantasy Pick of the Week: Matt Kuchar. One of the Tour’s most consistent players had 10 top-10s last season. Well, he’s off to an 0-for-1 start, after getting bounced early following rounds of 70-72. Sigh.last_img read more

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