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Ontario to allow credit unions to sell insurance in branches, on websites

first_imgQueen's Park, Ontario legislature, exterior warasit/123RF Keywords Credit unions,  Regulation,  Insurance,  Budget Rudy Mezzetta Current provincial legislation prevents credit unions in Ontario from selling and promoting insurance products other than credit, mortgage and travel insurance in branches. In 2015, the previous provincial government made changes to the act that specifically prohibited credit unions from promoting “non-authorized” insurance — such as auto, home and individual life and health insurance — on their websites. The proposed new legislative framework would also allow “insurance intermediaries and credit unions to seek mutual beneficial business relationships that could reduce costs,”  the budget document stated.Examples of this include a credit union and a local insurance brokerage co-locating in the same space, or a referral relationship between a credit union and a local insurance brokerage. According to the budget document, the proposed legislative framework would reduce regulatory burden on credit unions, boost competitiveness by expanding business opportunities and promote trust and stability. “Now more than ever is the time to ensure that the credit union and caisse populaires sector is competitive and not constrained by outdated or overly prescriptive legislation and regulations that limit its growth opportunities,” the budget document stated. The new framework would remove restrictions that limit credit unions’ ability to invest and broaden its ability to offer services to consumers. The new framework would also include a market code of conduct to boost consumer protection and a “strengthened” compliance regime. The government said that it would work with stakeholders on necessary regulations and with the Financial Services Regulatory Authority (FSRA) to develop rules through to the end of 2021, with the intention to enable the new framework to come into force in 2022. Earlier this year, at the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, the provincial government provided additional liquidity to the credit union sector to support its members. In the budget, the government announced that it approved an increase to FSRA’s line of credit with the province, which allows the regulator to provide emergency liquidity support should the need arise. There are 65 credit unions in Ontario serving 1.8 million members. Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Regulators issue new reporting guidance on systems outages Insurance regulators consult on conduct principles The Ontario government is proposing that the province’s credit unions be allowed to sell insurance products within their branches and on their websites. The proposal is part of a new regulatory framework to govern the province’s credit unions that the government announced in its 2020 budget on Thursday. The Credit Unions and Caisses Populaires Act, announced today, is intended to replace the Credit Unions and Caisse Populaires Act, 1994. The government had previously committed to updating the existing act and completed a legislative review to modernize it earlier this year.  Regulators must avert looming irrelevance: IAP Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Related newslast_img read more

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St. Ann Health Dept. to Clean up Discovery Bay on Labour Day

first_imgSt. Ann Health Dept. to Clean up Discovery Bay on Labour Day UncategorizedMay 22, 2006 RelatedSt. Ann Health Dept. to Clean up Discovery Bay on Labour Day FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The St. Ann Health Department will be engaged in a clean-up of the Discovery Bay area on Labour Day, May 23.Vector Control Officer at the St. Ann Health Department, Mark Miller, told JIS News that the clean-up exercise was a part of the Rodent Control Programme, which was currently underway in the Discovery Bay area.He explained that the programme was designed in three phases, with residents learning about rodent control methods through public education fora in the first, then the setting of baits in the second.“On Labour Day we will be carrying out activities such as the cleaning of drains, bushing of premises and removing illegal refuse dumps, especially in the Farm Town roadway, Old Folly and the Top Bay communities,” he said, adding that this plan of action would be the third phase of the programme.Mr. Miller pointed out that St. Ann Jamaica Bauxite Partners have been supporting the programme “tremendously”, and that other agencies such as the National Solid Waste Management Authority (NSWMA) and the North Eastern Parks and Markets Limited (NEPM) have been actively involved as well.“The NSWMA will be providing us with trucks for garbage collection and we will also be mobilizing persons in these communities, so that they can come together and assist in the cleaning-up of the areas,” he said.Citing the theme for National Labour Day 2006 -‘Jamaica’s Beauty – Our Duty’ – Mr. Miller said that community members should make themselves available on Labour Day in Discovery Bay and “give of their best to the project”. RelatedSt. Ann Health Dept. to Clean up Discovery Bay on Labour Daycenter_img RelatedSt. Ann Health Dept. to Clean up Discovery Bay on Labour Day Advertisementslast_img read more

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Catastrophic Draining Of Huge Lakes Tied To Ancient Global Cooling Event

first_imgThe catastrophic draining of two gigantic glacial lakes in Canada’s Hudson Bay region some 8,200 years ago appears to have caused the most abrupt, widespread cold spell on Earth during the last 10,000 years, according to a group of scientists. Don Barber, a geological sciences doctoral student at the University of Colorado at Boulder, said the lakes, Agassiz and Ojibway, contained more water than all of the Great Lakes combined. Barber and his colleagues estimated that when an ice dam from a remnant of the Laurentide Ice Sheet collapsed, the flow of lake water rushing through the Hudson Strait and into the Labrador Sea was about 15 times greater than the present discharge of the Amazon River. The fresh water probably gushed into the Labrador Sea in the North Atlantic for about a year, reducing sea-surface salinity and altering ocean circulation patterns at the time, said Barber, also a researcher at CU-Boulder’s Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research. Ocean circulation models suggest massive influxes of freshwater can disrupt heat transport in currents flowing from the tropics to temperate regions. Ice core data taken by scientists in Greenland show temperatures dropped by as much as 15 degrees Fahrenheit in central Greenland and by nearly 6 degrees F in Western Europe following the catastrophic lake drainage. “This was the coldest climate event in the last 10,000 years,” Barber said. A paper on the subject by Barber, published in the July 22 issue of Nature, was co-authored by INSTAAR’s John Andrews, Anne Jennings, Mike Kerwin and Mark Morehead. Other co-authors include John Southon of the Lawrence Livermore National Lab in Livermore, Calif., Art Dyke and Roger McNeely of the Geological Survey of Canada, Claude Hillaire-Marcel and Guy Bilodeau of the University of Quebec and Jean-Marc Gagnon of the Canadian Museum of Nature. The surface currents of the Atlantic act much like conveyor belts, carrying salty, warm water from the tropics to the temperate regions. The water cools in the temperate North Atlantic, then becomes dense enough to sink and send heat into the atmosphere, said Barber. Under normal conditions, winds blowing from the west across the Atlantic send air warmed by the sea toward Western Europe, said Barber. About one-third of the heat that warms Western Europe is delivered by the ocean, while the other two-thirds comes from the sun, he said. Although southern Greenland and northern Canada are at about the same latitude as Sweden and Norway, Greenland is almost uninhabitable because of its colder temperatures and lack of viable agricultural land for crops and livestock. But if an enormous amount of freshwater is suddenly infused into the temperate Atlantic waters as it apparently was 8,200 years ago, Western Europeans could suffer severely. The Laurentide lakes drainage seems to have halted the sinking of surface waters in the Labrador Sea, temporarily crippling the water conveyor belt and causing the Western European cold snap to last for about 200 to 400 years, according to ice-core data. “If the scenarios of extreme global warming in the future come true, it could lead to significant melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet and create more precipitation at high latitudes,” said CU-Boulder geological sciences Professor John Andrews. “Adding very large amounts of freshwater to large rivers could conceivably close down the vertical circulation system in the North Atlantic, leading to another extreme cooling event.” Evidence for the catastrophic Laurentide lakes drainage comes from “red bed” sediments underlying the ancient glacial lakes that were carried some 800 miles through the Hudson Strait by the massive freshwater plume, said Barber. In addition, fossil clams from the Labrador seabed corresponding to the freshwater flood were radiocarbon-dated to about 8,200 years ago. In addition, oxygen isotopes from the shells of tiny, plankton-like organisms from the same age of sediments showed the creatures lived in less salty water about 8,200 years ago, indicating the Laurentide lake drainage made the Labrador Sea significantly fresher. At its peak about 20,000 years ago, the Laurentide Ice Sheet that covered much of North America dipped down south as far as Ohio, and the ice is estimated to have been a mile deep at present-day Detroit, said Barber. At the time of glacial lake draining, the Laurentide Ice Sheet probably had retreated by about 80 percent. Published: July 20, 1999 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

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Pink Life Saver participates in free Boulder campus health screenings

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Oct. 26, 2012 The Be Colorado free and confidential health screenings return to the Boulder campus on Oct. 31 and Nov. 2, and this time they are bringing a special guest… a 38-foot-long “life saver” on wheels. Newly launched, the Pink Life Saver is a mobile mammography coach designed to travel throughout the metro Denver area.The mission of the Pink Life Saver is to provide convenient and easy access for women to have their annual mammogram. The American Cancer Society has identified lack of convenience/time as the number one reason women choose not to get this life-saving exam. Provided by the University of Colorado Hospital Breast Imaging Department at the Diane O’Connor-Thompson Breast Center, the Pink Life Saver says, “no more excuses.”Campus community members interested in making an appointment should call (720) 848-1030. A woman cannot get a mammogram if she was diagnosed with breast cancer within the past two years, is currently being treated for breast cancer, has a new breast problem or she is breast feeding or has breast fed within the last six months.Other health screening services will include a Lipid Profile with Glucose (total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides and blood glucose), blood pressure and measurement of height, weight and waist circumference and a health assessment profile—a value of more than $200. Free flu shots are also available.All health screening participants will be automatically entered to win 1 of 10 electric bikes. Be Colorado health screenings are absolutely private and confidential. The university will not see anyone’s private health information. This would violate the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).For more information, including scheduling your screening appointment, visit the website at www.becolorado.org.last_img read more

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Siemens Healthineers ships its first “Made in India” CT-scanner

first_img The missing informal workers in India’s vaccine story By EH News Bureau on December 26, 2019 Phoenix Business Consulting invests in telehealth platform Healpha Share Add Comment Advanced TherapiesBengaluruComputed TomographyCT ScannerMade in IndiaSiemens HealthineersSomatom go.NowSomatom go.platformSomatom go.UpX-Ray Siemens Healthineers ships its first “Made in India” CT-scanner Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals releases first “Comprehensive Textbook of COVID-19” Heartfulness group of organisations launches ‘Healthcare by Heartfulness’ COVID care app MedTech News WHO tri-regional policy dialogue seeks solutions to challenges facing international mobility of health professionals Menopause to become the next game-changer in global femtech solutions industry by 2025 Somatom go.platform with Somatom go.Now and Somatom go.Up scanners offers unique automated workflows that helps users achieve profound clinical resultsSiemens Healthineers has shipped its first “Made in India” CT scanner from its new state-of-the-art medical imaging factory in Bengaluru, inaugurated on September 19, 2019. The Somatom go.platform with the Somatom go.Now and Somatom go.Up scanners offers unique automated workflows that helps users achieve profound clinical results. Manufacturing of the scanners has already started at the recently inaugurated Siemens Healthineers manufacturing facility in Bengaluru.“With 350+ Somatom go. platform installations across the country, this manufacturing facility further strengthens our commitment to India.  Somatom go. platform CT scanners will help our customers expand their radiological portfolio, become more competitive and achieve consistent, user-independent quality”, said Suraj Chandrasekharan, Head of Diagnostic Imaging, Siemens Healthineers, India.The Somatom go. platform has an innovative way of fulfilling its customers’ desire for efficient workflows and a high level of flexibility: It can be controlled via wireless tablet, a technology which paves the way for an entirely new mobile workflow. Users can control all routine and advanced examinations using just the tablet. The standardised work steps are designed so that the users can run the scan with just a few inputs. Automated post-processing makes it even easier to operate the scanners. The standardisation also gives radiologists additional assurance with regards to the diagnostic quality of the images.Vivek Kanade, Executive Director, Siemens Healthineers India said, “Co-created in collaboration with the users to address their needs, the Somatom go. platform offers high quality standards and addresses the ever-increasing needs of workflow efficiency, clinical and financial requirements; enabling them to  improve patient experience.”Technological advances are driving transformation in the healthcare industry. As a part of the long-term strategy for India, Siemens Healthineers has integrated manufacturing, technology and innovation functions at Bengaluru with the state-of-the-art technology and innovation centre to better leverage synergies while developing offerings aligned to the future needs of our customers.The ISO13485 (2016) certified  manufacturing facility at Bengaluru caters products across Advanced Therapies, Computed Tomography and X-ray systems; aiming to offer unique combinations of technology, software and clinical applications, to enable healthcare professionals to deliver high value care. Comments (0) Related Posts Read Article MaxiVision Eye Hospitals launches “Mucormycosis Early Detection Centre”last_img read more

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From Human Zoos, College Students Learn the Consequences of Scientific Racism

first_img“We must remember the past to help us avoid making the same mistakes again. Instead of covering it up like we are doing today we must learn from it.”“Every college student should be required to watch this documentary so that they can be exposed to this information and learn how to work against scientific racism, and more importantly, how to work to never allow some of the examples given in the movie to repeat themselves in the future.”“When the past is ignored and swept under the rug, it has a way of coming back up again. Even now, evolution is being used to spread racism by white supremacists in America… but an understanding of the past can help prevent it from spreading.” “I’m still in disbelief people could treat other people like this.”“Over the course of the show, my emotions were varying from sadness to anger… I am continuously shocked at events in history that many people just want to gloss over and completely forget about.”“Hearing the stories of different tribes being advertised, presented, and degraded at the World’s Fair made my stomach turn. These people were being used to support scientific claims that humans evolved from apes.”“To think that in the 20th century millions of human beings were compared to apes was just a difficult concept for me to grasp.”“I did not think the movie was actually going to examine literal human zoos. I thought the title was a metaphor for the devaluing of certain types of people… to say I was shocked at the events that took place surrounding actual human zoos, like at the St. Louis World’s Fair, is an understatement. It was mind-boggling.” Setting a New Example For some, the topics explored by the film were intensely personal. At one point Human Zoos describes how eugenicists regarded multi-racial persons as “mongrels.” “As a person who is biracial, this part really hit me and made me upset,” wrote one student. “This made me upset because it hurt to see how people treated other people and tried to control their lives and who people can love.” A number of students wondered how people could degrade their fellow humans in the ways shown in the film. “As I was made aware of this piece of history,” a student recounted, “I experienced deep sadness. I asked myself: how could humanity have gotten to this barbaric place?” Another wrestled with why “the majority of people were silent about the mistreatment of Ota Benga. Day after day, individuals stopped to look at Benga as if he were an animal… some individuals even threw objects at him in a way one would an animal.” It made the student “think of times that I was silent in cases that I could have spoken up on behalf of an individual.” “Still in Disbelief” Another student concluded: “Look for that person who is different, whether it be race, social class, or anything else and just simply befriend them and let them know that you care for them.”  Culture & Ethics From Human Zoos, College Students Learn the Consequences of Scientific RacismJohn G. WestFebruary 20, 2019, 3:58 PM John G. WestSenior Fellow, Managing Director, and Vice President of Discovery InstituteDr. John G. West is Vice President of the Seattle-based Discovery Institute and Managing Director of the Institute’s Center for Science and Culture. Formerly the Chair of the Department of Political Science and Geography at Seattle Pacific University, West is an award-winning author and documentary filmmaker who has written or edited 12 books, including Darwin Day in America: How Our Politics and Culture Have Been Dehumanized in the Name of Science, The Magician’s Twin: C. S. Lewis on Science, Scientism, and Society, and Walt Disney and Live Action: The Disney Studio’s Live-Action Features of the 1950s and 60s. His documentary films include Fire-Maker, Revolutionary, The War on Humans, and (most recently) Human Zoos. West holds a PhD in Government from Claremont Graduate University, and he has been interviewed by media outlets such as CNN, Fox News, Reuters, Time magazine, The New York Times, USA Today, and The Washington Post.Follow JohnProfile Share A Physician Describes How Behe Changed His MindLife’s Origin — A “Mystery” Made AccessibleCodes Are Not Products of PhysicsIxnay on the Ambriancay PlosionexhayDesign Triangulation: My Thanksgiving Gift to All Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Some reflected on what the documentary meant for how we view science: Photo: A scene from Human Zoos, via Discovery Institute. Congratulations to Science Magazine for an Honest Portrayal of Darwin’s Descent of Man After the screening, I was able to participate in a stimulating discussion with the students via Zoom. Students in Madtes’s class later wrote reflections on what they learned from film, and I have been reading them this week. TagsAfrican-American historyhistoryHuman ZoosJohn WestMount Vernon Nazarene UniversityOta BengaP.T. BarnumPaul MadtesQ&Ascientific racismscreeningSt. Louis World’s FairstudentsThe Greatest Showman,Trending One of the rewarding experiences that go with creating a film is doing live screenings and being able to interact in a personal way with viewers during Q&A. For my film Human Zoos (available now on YouTube), I have been fortunate to participate in over a dozen live screenings in the United States and Canada. Some of the screenings I attended in person; others I participated in online.  “A Summary of the Evidence for Intelligent Design”: The Study Guide Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Jane Goodall Meets the God Hypothesis I know that if I hear or see a person treating someone as inferior based on race, intelligence, or physical deformity that I will step up and defend the person being mistreated. Understanding how God has created each individual and the intrinsic value that comes with that should lead to every Christian treating everyone as if they were such. A Changed View of History, and of Science One of the most satisfying parts of producing a film or writing a book is learning how it has impacted the lives of other people. You never really know what the impact will be until after the project is released, and even then you sometimes may not know a lot.  I want to thank Professor Madtes and his students for allowing me to see some of the ways Human Zoos challenged their thinking. Others told how the documentary revealed a part of history they had known nothing about. “It really opened my eyes,” wrote one student. “I had always known that racism was such a large problem that we face in our country today, but I had never heard of ‘scientific racism’ until watching this documentary.” Thanks to biology professor Paul Madtes, Mount Vernon Nazarene University in Ohio screened Human Zoos for around 150 students last fall. The screening took place the night of Halloween, which I suppose might be regarded as somewhat appropriate given the grim content of the film.  Many students expressed shock: Recommended Finally, a number of students said they were inspired to overcome the past by setting a different example:  Science will always involve humans and therefore it will always involve some amount of prejudice and bias. We need to be aware of this when considering things presented as scientific facts. This is also the reason that it is crucial for science to be an open discussion. Even when something is accepted by the majority, there should always be discussion of flaws and consideration of alternative views. Origin of Life: Brian Miller Distills a Debate Between Dave Farina and James Tour Requesting a (Partial) Retraction from Darrel Falk and BioLogos Many students stressed the importance of learning from history, which was one of my hoped-for takeaways from the film:  Another student was shocked to learn from the film that P.T. Barnum in his entertainment shows had marketed an African-American man as a “Man-Monkey”: This really startled me because P.T. Barnum is who the movie The Greatest Showman is based off of, and I absolutely love that movie. I never once thought of it as showing off the different races as less than or inferior to the whites. When I heard about these facts about Barnum’s show, it made me think about how distorted information can get, and how we tend to just hear the things that sound good or interest us.last_img read more

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Report Gives Georgia “F” Regarding State of Women

first_img Related Stories Share 0:58 | Play story Add to My ListIn My List Legal Advocate Discusses Medical Abuse At Shut Down Georgia ICE Facility For Whom The Bell Rings A report from the Center for American Progress reveals there are continuing disparities when it comes to equal pay and leadership opportunities for women.The State of Women in America graded each state in the areas of economics, leadership and health.Georgia’s overall grade was an F.Buffy Wicks is a senior fellow with the center.She uses Georgia’s leadership gap as an example of why the state received a poor ranking.“Georgia was zero percent women in U.S congressional office and zero percent in terms of statewide. That’s pretty alarming.”The zero percent of statewide held positions Wicks is referring to is for elected executive seats.WABE’s Rose Scott reports the findings from the report weren’t alarming to a Spelman College executive.0:58Dr. Jane E. Smith says while Georgia women are making some progress, there’s still a long way to go in closing those gaps.“I think that we have narrow and conservative definitions and expectations of the role of women in the workplace and in the home in general in the southeast.”Dr. Smith is executive director for Spelman’s Center for leadership and civic engagement.She sees a number of solutions to closing gaps within health, economics and leadership areas.“It starts with us, women building women,” says Dr. Smith.That’s one way, but there’s another import group according to the Spelman alumna.“We have no enemies. Men are a part of this movement and then those that may not agree with all of your positions in politics have to be a part of moving us forward.”Each year Spelman holds a conference dedicated to empowering women in leadership roles. ‘It’s Fractured’: Georgia Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan On Healing Republican Partylast_img read more

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Hundreds gather at Temple Beth-El to mourn the victims of Jersey…

first_imgBy Mike Montemarano/Hudson County ViewThe service was heavily guarded by dozens of police officers from the Jersey City Police Department and Hudson County Sheriff’s Office, who surrounded the temple on all sides and indoors.Local officials, religious leaders, and community members joined as one to memorialize all five victims who were killed by shooters David Anderson and Francine Graham: Jersey City PD Detective Joseph Seals, and four civilians; Leah Mindel Ferencz; Moshe Deutsch; Miguel Douglas; and an unidentified survivor who was able to escape the building and is in recovery.Ferencz co-owned the kosher deli with her surviving husband. Deutsch, a rabbinical student from Brooklyn, was visiting the deli at the time of the incident, while Douglas was an employee at the deli.Rabbi Leana Morrit led the evening’s services. A score of other religious leaders and public officials also spoke at the event. Countless priests, imams, pastors, and rabbis of a patchwork of denominations led the gathering in prayers and songs.She and other speakers dwelled on an ancient Jewish precept to stress the unity of the human race, and the efforts made by first responders who went into harm’s way to stop the violence.“Whoever destroys a single life is considered by Scripture to have destroyed the whole world, and whoever saves a single life is considered by Scripture to have saved the whole world,” Morrit noted.New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal offered condolences and vowed that law enforcement agencies will answer every single question surrounding the incident.“Actions speak louder than words. If we stand together as one perfect community, one Jersey City, and one state, we are sending a powerful message to those forces that try to divide us, stoke fear in our communities and young people, and those that want to do us harm.”“It’s important that we don’t let any of this become normalized. Our law enforcement partners are working diligently to answer every question that every one of you has about why this happened, and we will not rest until we share the answer to every single question with every one of you,” Grewal said.Jersey City Mayor Steven Fulop expressed sentiment that Jersey City must heal together as one. Hours before the service, he publicly expressed his adamant and widely-shared belief that there was no question the attack was a hate crime motivated by anti-Semitism and that it should be called out aggressively for what it is.“In all my time in public service, and even in the military, I’ve never seen anything like yesterday. We’ve been in several situations and gathered with the Sikh community, the Muslim Community, and the LGBTQ community, and here we are gathering for the Jewish community,” the mayor explained.“Every time, we gather in large numbers, speaking to our diversity which is one of the greatest strengths we have. We not only welcome the Orthodox community, but appreciate that they are here.”Dani Dayan, an ambassador to the Israeli Consul General, shared his concerns with residents about the recent rise in violent crimes committed against Jews both globally and in the United States, including the recent shooting at Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh.“I remember giving remarks during the memorial for an octogenarian holocaust survivor who was murdered in her apartment in Paris and I was shocked when I realized that 11 Jews were murdered in the last decade in France by anti-Semites,” Dayan stated.“Yet here we are, over a year and a half since then, burying 14 more Jews killed by anti-Semites in the United States. We have the experience of horrendous history, and we know what happens if we don’t erase anti-Semitism and racism from the earth immediately after it happens. Later, it could become too late.”American Defense League Regional Director Evan Bernstein echoed similar concerns about anti-Semitic incidents nationwide.“We’ve seen too much hate in this country and in New Jersey. What I see now is a normalization of hate and anti-semitism, we are dealing with almost one anti-semitic incident per day,” Bernstein said.“This was a targeted anti-Semitic attack where Jews were intentionally murdered, marking the third recent incident of its kind on American soil. This cannot become normalized.”According to New Jersey Israel Commission’s Andrew Gross, the rebuilding process has already begun in the area destroyed by gunfire.“We saw broken glass, bullet holes, and the books of school children who dropped them while hiding in their classrooms,” Gross said.“Despite the horrendous nature of these murders, we saw the owners and people outside of JC Kosher already rebuilding. Employees and community members were already there hammering nails into walls and restoring normalcy to the community, because we cannot be controlled by fear.”As the service went on, thousands of mourners, most of whom were members of the Orthodox community, congregated in the streets outside of different synagogues in both Jersey City and Brooklyn where Deutsch’s and Ferencz’s funerals were taking place, sobbing in the cold as eulogies were conducted. Hundreds gather at Temple Beth-El to mourn the victims of Jersey City shooting By Mike Montemarano – December 12, 2019 9:10 am 0 TAGSactive shootergurbir grewalinterfaith ceremonyjersey city shootingsteven fuloptemple beth-el SHARE Community RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Twitter Hoboken man killed in motorcycle crash on N.J. Turnpike in Kearny, state police say Previous articleJersey City mayor: ‘There’s no question this was an attack on the Jewish community’Next articleJersey City police sergeant hailed as hero for running towards gun fire to aid colleague Mike Montemarano center_img Last night, hundreds of Jersey City locals gathered in solidarity and in prayer at Temple Beth-El to mourn the victims of Tuesday’s horrific active shooting incident that killed a police officer and the occupants of a kosher deli on Martin Luther King Dr., devastating the Greenville neighborhood’s Jewish community and the region at large. CarePoint Health reaches deal for Cigna Health Insurance to join their network Bayonne 2-alarm fire leaves six people displaced, one suffers minor injuries, fire chief says Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Bayonne CommunityJersey City Bayonne last_img read more

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13-year-olds started blaze that killed one firefighter, left another unaccounted for

first_imgKSFN-TV(PORTERVILLE, Calif.) — Two 13-year-old boys have been arrested for allegedly starting a fire that left one firefighter dead and another unaccounted for, authorities said Wednesday. The fire erupted Tuesday at the city library in Porterville, California, about 80 miles southeast of Fresno. The powerful blaze caused the ceiling to collapse into the building, officials said.Porterville Fire Chief Dave LaPere choked back tears as he announced that the firefighter killed was identified as 35-year-old Porterville Fire Capt. Raymond Figueroa.Firefighter Patrick Jones remains unaccounted for, LaPere said at the Wednesday news conference.The two 13-year-old boys deemed responsible for the deadly blaze have been booked into the juvenile justice facility on charges of arson, conspiracy and manslaughter, Porterville Police Chief Eric Kroutil said.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Coronavirus updates: Texas closes bars, limits restaurants as cases rise

first_img11:15 a.m.: 16 NBA players test positiveThe NBA has tested 302 players for the coronavirus and 16 players have tested positive, the NBA said Friday.“Any player who tested positive will remain in self-isolation until he satisfies public health protocols for discontinuing isolation and has been cleared by a physician,” the NBA said in a statement.  The NBA plans to resume its season with 22 teams on July 31 at the Disney complex in Florida.Disney is the parent company of ABC News. 11 a.m.: ‘If we’re not careful, Mississippi will look like New York,’ officials warnOfficials with the Mississippi Health Department took to Facebook on Thursday to warn of an increase in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations in the state.State epidemiologist Dr. Paul Byers attributed most of the recent uptick to “broad community transmission.”The department said it traced recent cases back to parties, barbecues and other social events where people gathered without masks.State health officer Dr. Thomas Dobbs said the spike in coronavirus cases cannot be due to an increase in testing, because total testing has gone down.The officials warned that this surge is just the beginning if residents don’t take it more seriously.“If we’re not careful, Mississippi will look like New York,” Dobbs said.10:30 a.m.: NYC plans for indoor dining in phase 3 of reopeningNew York City is on track to begin phase 3 of reopening on Monday, July 6 — which will include nail salons, massage parlors and access to city basketball and tennis courts.Indoor dining can resume in phase 3 at 50% capacity, Mayor Bill de Blasio said Friday.The city is working to expand restaurant outdoor seating to city streets.To help keep employees and customers safe, 2.5 million face coverings will be distributed during phase 3, city officials said.The city is also working with businesses owners regarding “sneeze guards,” PPE and other equipment.10:15 a.m.: Texas limits restaurants, closes bars as cases riseIn Texas, Gov. Greg Abbott issued an executive order limiting certain businesses as the state’s positivity rate soared above 10%.All bars that receive more than 51% of their gross receipts from alcohol sales must close at noon on Friday. They can stay open for delivery and takeout, including alcohol, Abbott said.Restaurants must limit indoor dine-in service to 50% capacity beginning on Monday, he said.Rafting and tubing businesses must shut down, he said.Outdoor gatherings with more than 100 people must get approval from local governments, he added.“As I said from the start, if the positivity rate rose above 10%, the State of Texas would take further action to mitigate the spread of COVID-19,” Abbott said in a statement.“It is clear that the rise in cases is largely driven by certain types of activities, including Texans congregating in bars,” he said. “The actions in this executive order are essential to our mission to swiftly contain this virus and protect public health. We want this to be as limited in duration as possible.”9:30 a.m.: New Mexico’s phase 2 reopening on hold New Mexico’s phase 2 of reopening will be on hold as the state evaluates the “alarming sustained rise in cases nationally.” Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham said Thursday that New Mexico needs another week before deciding on more reopenings and if the mass gathering limit can be raised.“The last thing anyone wants to do is revert back to more closures in an emergency to protect public health,” the governor said in a statement. “New Mexico’s priority remains testing widely and isolating positive cases … rising cases levels will threaten reopenings, including for public schools in the fall. It is more important than ever to wear a mask and avoid groups.” New Mexico has over 11,000 diagnosed cases and at least 485 fatalities. Grisham said anyone traveling to New Mexico by car should self-isolate for two weeks when they arrive. 9 a.m.: American Airlines will sell all seats on flights starting July 1, joining UnitedAs travel ramps up, American Airlines says it will book flights to capacity beginning July 1.“American will continue to notify customers and allow them to move to more open flights when available, all without incurring any cost,” the airline said in a statement. “This is in addition to the airline’s current travel waivers.” United is already booking flights to capacity. “We do not block middle and/or adjacent seats,” the airline said. “If we expect a flight to be more full we reach out to our customers in advance to let them know and provide rebooking options. So far very few customers have rebooked.”5:30 a.m.: Alabama coronavirus cases soarThe number of COVID-19 cases in the state of Alabama continues to soar, which means the number of available ICU beds is dwindling.In a Federal Emergency Management Agency memo obtained by ABC News, hospitals in Montgomery, Tuscaloosa and Birmingham are now transferring patients from facility to facility because they are running out of ICU beds.In fact, 82% of Alabama’s ICU beds are now full, according to Dr. Don Williamson with the Alabama Hospital Association. He tells ABC News affiliate WBMA-TV that there are only 289 beds available in the state.Jeanne Marrazzo, director, Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Alabama Birmingham, told the station that she worries what July will look like for the state.“If we are seeing this very big peak in cases right now, the hospitalization and death rates as we know, typically lag two to two and a half to three cases behind those case reports,” Marrazzo said.Alabama has more than 33,000 diagnosed cased of COVID-19 with at least 896 deaths. Just this week, it set a daily record with 1,100 new coronavirus cases.The concerning rise in cases it’s exclusive to Alabama. It’s just one of 15 states that have set a daily COVID-19 case record in the past week. The other states are Texas, Montana, Nevada, Mississippi, Missouri, Florida, Oklahoma, South Carolina, California, Arizona, Idaho, Georgia, Utah and Tennessee.There are now also 23 states with rising COVID-19 hospitalization rates, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved. narvikk/iStockBy WILLIAM MANSELL and EMILY SHAPIRO, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 490,000 people worldwide. Over 9.6 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations’ outbreaks.The United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 2.4 million diagnosed cases and at least 124,468 deaths.Here’s how the news is developing Friday. All times Eastern:last_img read more

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