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Your column here – Silence is Complicity

first_img Ina Thorner says: 3 Comments We all MUST stand together for this inhuman violence to stop. Black, brown, red, yellow, white, mixed. All of us. Black men are being murdered. Red women are being murdered. Brown men, women and children are being kept in cages. Many immigrants are in slavery. Where are the moms? The women of the Me Too movement? The businesses we all sustain? Do they care less for human life than property? Where are the interfaith organizations? The balanced media coverage? The politicians? May 30, 2020 at 12:18 PM I cannot even imagine standing around doing nothing while an adult verbally harasses a child! What is wrong with people??? I hope that I shall always do the right thing and be an ally.Thank you for all that you do! Comments are closed. May 30, 2020 at 1:49 PM May 31, 2020 at 6:32 PM HomeBad BehaviorYour column here – Silence is Complicity May. 30, 2020 at 6:00 amBad BehaviorColumnsFeaturedNewsYour Column HereYour column here – Silence is ComplicityGuest Author1 year ago#blacklivesmattercommittee for racial justiceSanta Monica Bay Human Relations CouncilSURJyour column here Written by the Committee for Racial JusticeEndorsed by the Santa Monica Bay Human Relations CouncilBy now, many people know the names Ahmaud Arbery and, more recently, George Floyd. Many are wondering how/why do these events keep happening. There may be some clues in a local event in Santa Monica that you may have read about in last weekend’s paper. A little black boy was riding his bike home with his mom. They were around 4th and Montana when a young white man started swearing at and using the “N” word while verbally assaulting the boy. That hate crime was bad enough, but this was not a deserted street. There were passers-by and they DID NOTHING! This is nothing new. Robbie Jones, a 62yr Pico Neighborhood resident, says “28 years ago, when my son was attending Roosevelt elementary school. I experienced almost the exact same incident . The guy was a body builder. He came directly at me shouting obscenities and racial slurs at me and then attempted to punch me in the face as people on the street walked pass. I remember being relieved and grateful as I hurriedly got on the bus shaken, disturbed and just cried my eyes out. I remember feeling ashamed (as though I had caused this to come upon myself). I felt frightened, angry and sad all at the same time. I am still shaken by the incident today.”Do white people understand that when we see or hear something and DO NOTHING, we are causing more trauma? Silence is not neutral. Silence is on the side of the oppressor. Our high schools are not immune. When black students are threatened, white students stand by and do nothing and white parents protect the oppressors, and deride the black parents, causing further trauma. In a racist country, especially when witnessing a racist event, to be silent is to strengthen the systems of oppression and increase the trauma. Silence in the face of racism speaks volumes. Silence IS complicity.If we are white and we “Stand by” and “act nice” and are not working to be anti-racist, we are fueling the system. We did not shout at this little boy, but we might as well have. We didn’t shoot Ahmaud Arbery or suffocate George Floyd or murder the thousands of other unnamed victims of racism, but we might as well have. We are a part of the system that allows this to happen. If we are not working to eradicate racism then we are contributing to the problem. From the little boy on 4th and Montana to the man jogging through a white neighborhood, these incidents stem from systemic problems. We have a choice. We can do nothing and allow it to become worse. Or we can actively work to eradicate it. Anti-racist work will be misunderstood by your friends. They will try to convince you that there was a reason for each of these incidents, claiming that in each case, the black person was in the wrong somehow, and that you just don’t have enough evidence/information. You are jumping to conclusions and don’t really understand how life works, they will say. Your friends mean well but they are contributing to the problem. And so are you if you allow them to derail your sense of justice. That is part of how the system reinforces itself.Do not stand by and watch and strengthen the racism that infects our society. Stand with us against racism and work for justice. It does not have to be this way. We can dismantle this system. But it will take a whole lot more of us standing up, calling out and working for a better way. We hope you will join us. #CommitteeForRacialJustice, #SURJ, #BlackLivesMatter, #AWAREWritten by the Committee for Racial Justice. Endorsed by the Santa Monica Bay Human Relations CouncilTags :#blacklivesmattercommittee for racial justiceSanta Monica Bay Human Relations CouncilSURJyour column hereshare on Facebookshare on Twittershow 3 comments Cathie Gentile says: Romney Woods says: Thank you.Thank you.Thank you.Thank you.Thank you so very much.It’s nice to hear someone speak about a SOLUTION to the/this problem, and not just about the Problem !!#Solutions To The Problem (#STP)#MeToo,Too Virus ignited in US no earlier than mid-January, study saysAirport artists create drive-by art in isolationYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall6 hours agoColumnsOpinionYour Column HereBring Back Library ServicesGuest Author12 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter17 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor17 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press17 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press17 hours agolast_img read more

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George Floyd’s voice haunted Derek Chauvin murder trial

first_imgPattanaphong Khuankaew/iStock(MINNEAPOLIS) — During the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, jurors heard from 45 witnesses. But legal experts say the voice that may have resonated most in the courtroom every day was one from the grave.In what legal experts called a rarity for the criminal justice system, George Floyd played a major role in the trial of the man prosecutors allege killed him. Jurors saw and heard Floyd up close, in multiple videos, begging for his life up until his final breath.The jury in the high-profile case announced on Tuesday afternoon that it had reached a unanimous verdict finding Chauvin guilty on the charges of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter.Dr. Ziv Cohen, a clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at Cornell University, said that the videos the panel saw of Floyd’s final moments were “powerful” evidence for the prosecution.“That video is the star of this trial. It’s the star witness of this trial. It’s the biggest piece of evidence in this trial,” Cohen told ABC News prior to the verdict being announced.In bystander video taken from just feet away from Floyd and the officers who were on top of him during the May 25, 2020, arrest, and in even closer police body camera videos, jurors heard Floyd not just begging for his life but talking about his deceased mother, children and predicting his own demise.“They gonna kill me. They gonna kill me, man,” Floyd is heard saying in the now-famous video taken by a then-17-year-old high school student, Darnella Frazier.Frazier’s video recording appears to show Chauvin pressing his left knee on the back of Floyd’s neck as he cried out 27 times, “I can’t breathe,” and eventually said, “My neck. I’m through. I’m through.”“My stomach hurt. My neck hurts. Everything hurts,” Floyd said in the video, his face pushed against the pavement. “Give me some water or something, please.”As the disturbing footage continues, Floyd refers to Chauvin as “Mr. Officer” and speaks of his family: “Can’t believe this, man. Mom, love you. Love you. Tell my kids I love them. I’m dead.”In police body camera footage taken earlier in the episode, the handcuffed man tells the officers he is “claustrophobic” and suffers from “anxiety” as he pleads with them not to put him in the back of a cramped police cruiser.“Can you put me in the front, please?” he asked, the officers attempting to shove him into the backseat, saying, “I’m not a bad guy, man. I’m not a bad guy.”At one point he even has a conversation with Charles McMillian, 61, a concerned bystander who tried to intervene, asking Floyd to get into the squad car and saying, “You can’t win.”“I’m not trying to win,” Floyd responded.When Chauvin and the other officers remove him from the vehicle and start to place him on the ground, Floyd said, “Thank you” and “I’m gonna lie on the ground. I’m going down.”Cohen said that while many murder trials nowadays are bound to feature some form of video, mostly surveillance video with no audio, the Chauvin trial is unique for the abundance of footage, from multiple angles.“Certainly hearing George Floyd in distress for a very long period of time, kind of seeing him in his agony and in the final moments of his life, is disturbing to your average viewer and to the jury,” Cohen said. “You clearly see that George Floyd is having fear, anxiety, he’s in pain, his voice is thick, he’s struggling. At various points, he cries out. So, I think the challenge here is that you’re not seeing a placid victim, or a placid decedent, where you might try to convince yourself that he’s not suffering.”He said Chauvin’s attorney, Eric Nelson, has been attempting to undo the power of those images with “ideas, facts that might muddy the waters in terms of what would appear to be very clear from the video.”Brian Buckmire, a New York City public defender and an ABC News legal contributor, said most state courts allow such video, which is considered out-of-court hearsay, to be used at trial under what is called the Dying Declaration Rule.“We presume that the last words of a person dying are going to be true, because why would you lie if you are about to die?” Buckmire said, explaining the rule. Still, he agreed that such video in a murder trial is “extremely rare.”“When we see video in homicide cases, it’s usually grainy video from a distance,” Buckmire added. “I don’t think I’ve ever seen this much video of someone’s final moments of life in a criminal prosecution.”He said the videos used by prosecutors in the case have also been powerful in humanizing Floyd to the point where it’s “almost slightly divine.”“When you hear someone’s final words, saying, ‘Thank you’ to an officer for taking him out of a car, calling their mother, I think that resonates with a lot of people,” Buckmire added. “I think you hear that and everyone goes to that point and time if they’ve lost someone and the final words of that person.”Not only have the prosecution and defense been allowed to replay the video countless times, but both sides also have been permitted to seize on freeze frames of the footage in arguments over whether Chavin was following his training as a Minneapolis police officer.Nelson, the defense attorney, even tried countering the prosecution’s case by playing for the jury part of a previous arrest of Floyd in May 2019, to illustrate similarities with the fatal 2020 arrest and to show the effects opioids allegedly had on Floyd.“You’re not just hearing it second-hand from someone else,” Buckmire said, “which is very rare.”Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. 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Browns Defense All Bark and No Bite

first_img Related TopicsBrownsJoe Haden Browns defensive coordinator Jim O’Neil has been the subject of scrutiny in recent weeks as his defense ranks 32nd in the league in total yards allowed. If you ask O’Neil, however, he’ll be the first person to tell you how great his defense is.During Thursday’s press conference in Berea, O’Neil opened up by telling members of the media, “I thought our tackling improved from the previous week. Our guys did a good job. I thought they brought that mindset that we talked about. I thought we had some guys really step up.”If week four’s epic collapse in San Diego is what any of the coaches consider to be “a good job”, then there is no hope Browns fans when it comes to this regime.All off-season Browns coaches tried to convince fans that this team would be built on a strong defense. The selections of Danny Shelton, Nate Orchard, who has been a non-factor all season thus far, and Xavier Cooper were supposed to bolster the run defense which finished 32nd in the league in 2014.Not only has the run defense been among the worst in the NFL, ranked 31st allowing an average of 141.5 yards per game, but now the pass defense is near the bottom as well, ranked 22nd allowing an average of 264.8 yards per game.Veteran players are trying to defend their individual performances, like Tramon Williams claiming he was not offsides on a crucial last-second penalty that may have cost the Browns the game.Joe Haden is defending himself from criticism that he should have played through an injury.Jim O’Neil is defending himself and his players at the podium.If only they were this defensive on the field!Head coach Mike Pettine was supposed to be a defensive coach with a solid pedigree from his years with the Jets and Bills, yet he is no longer there and those teams have significantly better defenses than Cleveland.Cornerback Justin Gilbert was the highest draft pick taken since Pettine began his tenure in Cleveland and now he’s being used as a kick returner and potentially a wide receiver. If defense is Pettine’s expertise, why is his highest draft pick on defense being worked out as an offensive player?Pettine and O’Neil continue to tell the media and fans they have great players on defense. Actions speak louder than words and if the actions on the field don’t improve soon, we won’t be hearing many more press conferences from this regime. Matt Medleycenter_img Matt Medley is co-editor at NEO Sports Insiders, covers the Cleveland Cavaliers, Cleveland Indians and high school sports in Northeast Ohio.Follow @MedleyHoops on Twitter for live updates from games.last_img read more

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Sterling Elementary Principal Receives ‘Unsung Hero’ Grant

first_imgKelly’s innovative teaching idea, “Our Caring School Community,” focuses on applying the Caring School Communities curriculum to the Sterling community in order to develop a caring, empathetic and growth-oriented school culture. Kelly and the school’s staff believe that the Caring School Curriculum, which complements the school’s existing Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports framework, will successfully encourage students, staff and families to join together in building a strong and caring school culture. The curriculum provides daily lessons on empathy, growth mindset, bullying prevention and kindness; home-side activities for students to start in class and complete with their families; and school-wide community building events. This grant will allow the opportunity for Kelly to be considered for further grants of up to $25,000. Dusek: “The grant brings $2,000 dollars to the school to work on the Sterling Elementary Caring School Community Program. So, great job to Mrs. Kelly and Sterling Elementary, and looking forward to seeing that grant implemented.”  FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Sterling Elementary School received the Voya Unsung Heroes Grant for its Innovative Teaching Program.The grant was awarded to Principal Denise Kelly, KPBSD Superintendent Sean Dusek: “She was one of only a hundred winners from across the country, and the only winner is Alaska.”  Story as aired:last_img read more

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